Articles on ‘Presentation Delivery’

Improving Your Presentation Delivery Skills

A good delivery of your presentation can give you a certain uniqueness and extra edge.

The audience will make judgements about you even before you start to speak.  They will do this by way you come across and how you look.  They will continue to form opinions about you by the way you speak.

So the way in which you use your own personal resources  is going to have a large impact on the way your audience receives you. Read more »

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Make Eye Contact to Engage Your Audience

You’re looking good, but how do you engage with the audience?
So – now you are looking good but your audience don’t seem to look that interested – how do you engage with them?
It’s no good waiting for your audience to become interested in you – you need to take the initiative. Often people tell me when they present they just see a sea of blank faces staring at them. This is because they are treating the audience as one body – of a mass of people, rather than individuals.
To start to treat the audience as individuals you need to look at them – individually. This means you need to make eye contact with individuals in the audience. People are often hesitant about using eye contact – they feel it may intimidate their audience. But it actually has the opposite effect – it draws people in and engages them more fully.
Some help making eye contact
To help develop confident, controlled use of eye contact practice this exercise. You will need to stand in the middle of a room – ideally without anyone else there – as they will probably put you off!
Start to tell a story – something like what you have done today from when you got up in the morning, travelled to work, went to lunch etc. As you recite your story – focus on different objects in the room for about three seconds at a time. For example, you can look at the door, picture on the wall, light, chair, plant etc.
What you are now doing is giving eye contact around the room in a controlled and purposeful way. This is what you need to do with your audience – to keep everyone interested and involved.
By practising this exercise it will soon become a habit to automatically share your eye contact around the audience. You will look more purposeful and you will actually start to see a response from the audience. It makes the whole experience more interesting and a lot more fun to do!
Obviously this is even more effective to practice with an audience present. On our public courses we work on using eye contact by learning to engage with the other people on the course when we are presenting to them. It is a fun exercise to do with others and once people start to do it they soon find it difficult to present without looking at their audience!

The ability to Engage with the presentation audience is a key skill that many presenters simply don’t possess. You might have a great presentation ready to deliver but if you cant really connect with the audience – engage with them – then you are unlikely to have a successful outcome.

But how do you engage with the audience? And is it a skill that can be developed? Read more »

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Speak with More Confidence and Clarity

When you stand up to present you need to sound confident and in control from the very beginning.  Your words need to be spoken clearly and they also need to be heard by the audience at the back of the room.  And if your presentation is taking place in a room bigger than about ten square metres then its no use just using your normal conversational voice – you need to raise your game and project your voice to some extent.

Unfortunately however, at the start of a presentation, nerves can often be at their strongest and this can leave you rushing your words, speaking at a relative whisper or even being tongue tied. Learning some simple voice exercises however, can help you get overcome these obstacles. Read more »

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Presenting Your Influential Voice

I happened to be watching Sky News this lunchtime – taking a break from my more normal working routine.

What caught my attention though wasn’t the normally slick presentation that you come to expect from most of the Sky presenters.

It was the fact that I just couldnt make out what the Business Presenter was saying!  I’m quite interested in the Business News after all – especially given our livelihood is very much dependent on how quickly we can all drag ourselves and the country out of this recession! Read more »

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How (Not) to Present with PowerPoint

You know, I’ve seen some terrible PowerPoint presentions in my time.  You’ve probably seen lots of poor presentations as well – in fact the vast majority of business people probably have.

So why is it that with so much experience of bad PowerPoint presentations so many people still present as if they are there simply to run through someone elses badly composed PowerPoint slides?

Might it be that having seen so many bad presentations, many just think that these “terrible presentations” are simply a fact of business life and something that presenters are expected to produce and the rest of us endure!

Anyway, I dont have all the answers and it’s now late on Friday night – it’s been a long week … so a more light hearted look at PowerPoint is called for.

Read more »

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PowerPoint Presentation Skills Tips for Effective Presenting

How often have you switched off (even for a few seconds) when attending yet another PowerPoint Presentation at work?

Our experience is that this probably happens more than 9 times out of 10.

So that’s about 90% of PowerPoint presentations where the lack of PowerPoint presentation skills actually undermines the very presentations PowerPoint is supposed to enhance.

So why do people continue down this road to presentation anesthesia?  And can we divert at least some of them to a more enlightened, creative approach? Read more »

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Life after Death by Powerpoint

You’ve probably heard the phrase “death by Powerpoint” used lots of times at work.  There’s no great secret to how to achieve that.  In fact we’ve probably all witnessed it many times in the past!

But why not look on the brighter side of life with Powerpoint?

Don McMillan is a great exponent of the funnier side of Powerpoint and his latest video (below) is absolute proof that there is definitely Life after Death By Powerpoint!

Enjoy!

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Presentation Skills from London Training Course Providers – The Power of Eye Contact

One of the key areas that can have a significant impact on the success (or not) of your presentation is how you connect visually with your audience.  And one of the main ways of achieving that is by using eye contact. Read more »
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